What to wear to a item product

Here’s an example: Maureen Nelson. Maureen worked for Employer A, which was located across the street from Company B. Employer A was a contract position and Maureen needed benefits, so she went to B. Company B had buyer’s remorse after two months (Maureen never knew why) and she was asked to resign.

Another person had done everything you should do when it came to both her job search and to evaluating a position at one of the top employers in the United States. She interviewed several times, researched the company, evaluated the job offer, and talked to her future co-workers and supervisor.

Presuming that she had made a good decision, she packed her bags and relocated to a new city to take what she thought was an exciting new job. Only it wasn’t. The position was nothing like anyone had described it.

The only explanation she got when she asked about the difference between the job she thought she was hired for and what she was doing, was that she could work her way up to more responsibility.

“The best part: A few months later, I was hired at Employer C, which paid me 30 percent more ($15K) than Employer B did! I actually moved for that job. It’s like the Chinese folk tale that starts with the horse running away – you never know, you never know – whether it’s good luck or bad luck.”

If going back to your old job isn’t an option, take some time to see if you were judging the job or the company in haste. Sometimes, our first impressions aren’t correct, and the job might be a better fit than you expected. Give it a chance and take some time to see if it’s as bad as you first thought.

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